Archives for children

The Days are Long

Last week I had to go to the curriculum open house night for Zain at his middle school.  This is a new school for Zain as he’s just started 6th grade. A middle schooler. This is the same little guy that came into this world without a sound, and his eyes wide open. Which seems like yesterday. No really…like yesterday. Mind you, he’s been alive for nearly 4,400 days and I’ll be honest, many of the details have slipped away—as I’ve definitely hit the age where I am operating on a one in, three out situation.  But to say that

I’m Not That Mom

Like most parents, I have my ups and downs—typically not in equal parts, but overall I think I get the job done well. My kids still smile when they see me.  And some may argue that I do a bit too much for them. But there are just some things that I will not, cannot, and or refuse to do. You’re Thirsty? Again?!?! I remember when Zain was a wee thing and we were out on an excursion when a friend reached into her stroller and pulled out a sippy cup that rattled.  As I looked at her with bewilderment, she

When a Book Is So Much More

I have always been an avid reader.  Growing up our school I rocked the Reading Olympics that helped raise money for the March of Dimes.  I would like to say that I crushed that fundraiser every year because I was very philanthropic at a young age, but truth be told, I just wanted a gold metal in a “sport” that didn’t require sweating (or athleticism) and loved to read.  So my best friend Molly and I would head to the library and literally get more books than we could carry and tuck ourselves in for a weekend of binge reading–who needed Netflix in

Gifted?

I grew up in a very small town in Northwest Iowa where my total class size never exceeded 45.  And where everyone was taught pretty much in the same fashion.  My school didn’t have all of the specialists and testing that they have today—likely none did back then.  But when I was in upper elementary they did have the “Talented and Gifted” program and man did I want to be included! I don’t remember how kids were selected to be in the program—likely some aptitude test.  I don’t test well, except on the ASVAB, which is an aptitude exam for

Step 1 To Having It All

When I was 10 I decided that I was going to be an interior designer when I grew up. I have no idea how I came to that conclusion and/or how I even knew what an interior designer was growing up in my itty town in the middle of nowhere Iowa WAY before HGTV was a thing. So as part of these plans, I set my sights on New York City…as a 10 year old from a town of 1,700. I declared to all of my friends that I was going to live in Brooklyn and adopt a daughter and name

A Frayed Knot

The Durranis are serial road trippers (as most of you probably already know) and as we plot, prepare and pack, everyone has the same response, “How can you be in the car that much? What do you do that whole time? Don’t you want to kill each other?” Our longest trip (of three) this summer included just over 3,500 miles and 64.5 hours of driving time. That doesn’t include all of the family time spent outside of the car those 10 days. That’s just the amount of time we were all four sitting within feet of each other cruising across

I Love Back to School

I have developed temporary carpal tunnel in my right pointer finger this week clicking “like” on so many first day of school photos that have been posted online.  I love them all!  I love seeing all of my friends’ children from across the world…how they have grown, how excited (or not) that they are to be going back to school, and am continually amazed at how much their children look just like them!  Their mini me’s make me smile! I’ve always loved the first day of school.  Don’t get me wrong, I hold a soft spot for summer vacations in

4 Survival Tips for Summer

As a kid there is nothing better than summer vacation–late nights, late mornings, no homework, more junk food, more TV and endless play time.  At least that is how I remember it in the 70s when I was growing up.  And while I never sensed that my mom was going out of her mind at the time, she had to have had her moments.  As I “work” through another summer with my boys, here are my four survival tips for summer that I learned from my mom! #1. Great Summer Care is Not Easy to Find My mom opened a

Tis the Season

Each time we transition from one season to the next, we feel the change in the weather and we adjust accordingly…stocking up hats and gloves, or shedding down to our swim suits.  Activities and interests change and availability to friends differs.  This is not unlike the seasons that we experience in our lives, albeit not ones that last only three months and are quite as predictable. As I look back on my life, I’ve had many “seasons”. My first being my toddler years (what I can remember of them) and into elementary school where I forged my first friendships and

My Big Ugly Cry

My mom used to cry every time that I left to go back to college, or later whenever we parted ways after a visit, and I would get so exasperated, almost embarrassed.  She was also a sucker for Kleenex and Hallmark commercials.  In my mind, she was a complete mush!  Of course, now she’s gone, and like most things that drove me crazy about her, I get it.  And dare say that I’ve become her.  I’m a complete empathetic crier.  I see someone else cry…I absolutely feel their pain, joy, hurt and I join right in.  I cry every time my